Sexism in the music industry.

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justdip
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:01 pm

Sexism in the music industry.

Post by justdip » Sun Apr 06, 2014 10:20 pm

It's rife and fucking terrible. Here's some words I wrote on it. Hopefully it'll start a conversation about the whole, horrid affair.

http://justdip.co.uk/2014/04/06/i-am-bo ... ful-women/


(If you have an issue with the self-promotion,I apologise. I just want lots of people to read this and maybe, y'know, do something)

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darlenet.
Posts: 755
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Location: Gainesville, Florida USA

Re: Sexism in the music industry.

Post by darlenet. » Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:52 am

To this end, I think "The Voice" is one of the most hypocritical shows there is. The chairs are turned around and the judges claim it's all about the person's voice. But let's be honest, when that chair turns around and the singer is attractive, they are relieved and excited.

I do have hope, though. Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes is talented, making good music, and kicking ass while not looking conventional at all. Her music speaks for itself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8V6pPHMSEo
shows? 90 so far...

drinkthesunshinezine
Posts: 163
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Re: Sexism in the music industry.

Post by drinkthesunshinezine » Mon Apr 07, 2014 12:12 pm

I looked up both of those bands that you mentioned in your second paragraph (forgive me for not knowing them, but I'm over 30) and I don't see the difference between them and any other pop band. I don't think, "It’s a vicious chain, bleeding into this world from that of pop," as you say. They are the world of pop. Look at the top of Tonight Alive's website - ITunes, Vevo, Songl, GooglePlay, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube. What's the difference between them and McFly? You don't have to be a 'cynic' to wonder whether their outfits are being chosen for them - of course they are. Look at the blokes in the band too. They are styled to within an inch of their lives too. Take it all with a pinch of salt.

I just finished reading Tracey Thorn's autobiography - even as a introvert female singer in a moderately successful indie band in the 80's she writes of having make-up and her wardrobes chosen for her.

The singers from We Are The In Crowd and Tonight Alive have made their choice to chase fame and fortune - good luck to them. I'm not convinced it's forced on them though. Emily Barker, Courtney Barnett and Kimya Dawson don't appear in revealing outfits and they've done pretty well so far (and all made far better music too in my opinion).
Behind The Scene Gloucestershire - a free monthly online music fanzine http://issuu.com/gloszine

justdip
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:01 pm

Re: Sexism in the music industry.

Post by justdip » Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:11 am

I disagree with a majority of your post. Genre is nothing more than marketing at the end of the day, but both these bands write their own music, play their own instruments and have slowly built up a fanbase to get to where they are today. They're honest and lovely people, not that that has anything to do with it. The fact TA advertise the range of social media on the top of their website is nothing more than common sense. Why wouldn't you want to make it as easy as possible for fans?
It's great that this problem has existed since the eighties, but maybe you're missing my point. This isn't an attack on pop music.

I know one of the names you've listed, and that's only through FT. In terms of success and reach, none of them come close to WATIC or TA. Anyway, you've taken this off onto a tangent that has little to do with the point of the article. Thanks for reading it, though.

drinkthesunshinezine
Posts: 163
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 3:11 pm

Re: Sexism in the music industry.

Post by drinkthesunshinezine » Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:32 am

I thought the point of your article was that female 'rock' band members are being forced to look like 'pop' stars as that's being suggested to them as the best way to sell more records. Hardly a revelation!

It just seems a little naïve to suggest that musicians should be judged only on their music, when bands like the ones you have mentioned are essentially a business. They need to make money for a living (nothing wrong with that) and the best way to do it is by creating an image that sells lots of records and tickets to the teenage market.

Sorry for taking it on a tangent, but I guess that's what happens when you put something on the internet for discussion.
Behind The Scene Gloucestershire - a free monthly online music fanzine http://issuu.com/gloszine

lareinedeslames
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Re: Sexism in the music industry.

Post by lareinedeslames » Thu Apr 10, 2014 3:46 pm

I think as far as sexism in entertainment goes, there are far, far more pernicious issue at play than the one you're picking out here. Is it unfair that more socially standardized "pretty" women tend to get ahead in the industry, while those that are less conventionally attractive don't? Absolutely. But that's a thing EVERYWHERE in the world. In any job a woman goes for, she has to toe the line between being attractive enough for her the males holding the power while not being so attractive that she threatens any women who might hold authority.

Things that are more alarming to me about the music industry in the realm of sexism include the tendency to shoehorn women in terms of the content of their songs; this is done to some extent to many performers who are on major labels--but women get it the most thoroughly. The record label will sit on an album of songs that a woman wants to release if it doesn't fit the "niche" they have for her, sending her back over and over again, "helpfully" suggesting that she work with songwriters they assign to her to get the kind of songs they want. This does happen to a LOT of performers, both male and female--but it happens much more to female performers and bands (proviso: not all labels are like this, obviously; and depending on the negotiating power that a given act has, and other variables, they may not experience this at all, but if you're a young performer looking to hook up with a huge label, this is a common thing).

To me, that is so much more problematic than sexy packaging.

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