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longlivethefrank
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Post by longlivethefrank » Mon Nov 08, 2010 4:53 pm

newmy wrote:
longlivethefrank wrote:
newmy wrote: everyone now gets 3 As at a-level
Well...
I generalise of course.
A very false one in this case. There are a lot of measures in place so that exams and coursework are more difficult each year.

Pete
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Post by Pete » Mon Nov 08, 2010 5:18 pm

Absolute balls. Exams are most definitely not harder every year, or there would be a very large anomoly present in the fact the grades get better every year whilst we slip down world literacy and every other type of academic table.

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longlivethefrank
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Post by longlivethefrank » Mon Nov 08, 2010 6:20 pm

DISCLAIMER: Pete knows more than me about politics, I'm just trying to learn through debate. Happy to be told I'm wrong, as always.
Pete wrote:Absolute balls. Exams are most definitely not harder every year, or there would be a very large anomoly present in the fact the grades get better every year whilst we slip down world literacy and every other type of academic table.
Not necessarily. At least, not in my subjects. Coursework grade boundaries are played with to make sure there is not a higher number of students getting good grades each year. Marks go up each year on the same coursework questions just because teachers figure out what gets good marks, but then its all put into context with what the rest of the year gets and adjusted accordingly. Teaching is getting better and working hard for grades is slowly but surely getting back into minds as something that isn't anything to be ashamed of.

At the risk of sounding painfully new-Labour, that sort of criticism is pretty unfair to a lot of people in education. I had to work hard for my AAB at AS level, and I go to one of the statistically best colleges in the country. As do my friends, who mostly did a lot worse than me. And they're not stupid. Lazy, sure, stupid...no. A Levels are difficult, fact.
I'm not going to argue that exams are as hard as they were in the 70s or 80s or even 90s because I wouldn't know, and am fairly sure they're not, but the idea that they get slightly more generous each year to hit targets or whatever is, from my experience of teachers going on about how they're forced to ensure they're not going soft each year(in private, not some Labour political propaganda), not true.

Personal experience and sympathy-fishing aside, do you SERIOUSLY THINK it is A-level exams that are dragging down literacy rates? Of course it isn't. It is the underclass, the benefit huggers on the estates, or possibly a few with parents who have fluked into decent money but passed on their ethic of drink and laze. Thatcher's kids/Labour scroungers, whichever one you choose. These people do not sit A-level exams. They've been kicked out by then, if they've even made it to college in the first place. The minority that do sit them do not do well. I have friends who did vastly better than me at GCSE level but much worse at AS because they couldn't deal with the work.
Seriously, the kids bringing down our literacy rates have nothing to do with high A-level grades.

devilsadvocat
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Post by devilsadvocat » Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:20 am

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010 ... eat-cheese

Almost as good as Nicola Murray's wooden toys?

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longlivethefrank
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Post by longlivethefrank » Tue Nov 09, 2010 11:11 am

hahaha

Hatter
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Post by Hatter » Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:26 pm

Why is the protest march about the uni fees on a Wednesday?
Surely those protesting the most are students, who generally have school tomorrow...
I really don't see the logic in protesting about education by missing education.

devilsadvocat
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Post by devilsadvocat » Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:39 pm

A lot of those demonstrating are current uni students, who have wednesday afternoons off to play inter-uni sport.

Hatter
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Post by Hatter » Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:41 pm

That makes more sense, thanks :)

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Post by Pete » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:00 am

So it'll just be the fat unpopular kids protesting then? :wink:


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newmy
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Post by newmy » Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:04 pm


devilsadvocat
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Post by devilsadvocat » Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:30 pm

Not really

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teamescape
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Post by teamescape » Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:50 pm

devilsadvocat wrote:Not really
Brilliant.
Stu

Hatter
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Post by Hatter » Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:17 pm

Anyone else feel ashamed to be a student now after what happened today?
Like I don't get enough hostility from strangers who think I'm going to mug them just because I'm a teenager.

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Emitime
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Post by Emitime » Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:24 pm

As much as I do love the Daily Mash, that article does seem a little off to me.

Surely most of those protesting are already students, and as such aren't going to take the brunt of the cuts. Their departments are going to suffer, and as such probably their education a little bit (?), but they aren't going to be any worse off from it all.

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